Workshopping My A** Off – PWC 2016

aa vintage-writer-at-desk

As I mentioned in my first PWC post, the Philadelphia Writers’ Conference offers three-day workshops during the bulk of the day, as well as single sessions workshops in the morning and in the late afternoon. I literally collapsed each night when I got home. The workshops were amazing but intense.

Have you ever tried to make a pita sandwich at home? No matter what kind of pita you buy, all the stuffing manages to fall down the front of your shirt at first bite. That’s how I felt at the end of day: stuffed with new information threatening to spill out (okay, maybe that’s just my lack of homemaker skills, but you get the point). Luckily I took copious notes. I just need to figure out my handwriting.

My three-day intensive workshops were:

My one-session workshops:

Master Class – The Sound on the Page: Finding and Using Your Voice (Ben Yagoda)

I have to applaud the PWC for booking such great workshop leaders (and from what I heard, the other workshops were equally awesome!). To give you a taste of what I learned, I’m going to share a few tidbits of information on writing and story craft. Obviously, I’m not going to recreate every note (I had pages and pages and it wouldn’t be fair to the presenters), but I want to emphasize how attending a workshop can help you, as a writer, learn more, build your writing toolkit, and really pump up your fiction.

Note: I’ve been a reader all my life. As I was discussing with Kathryn Craft, I think voracious readers, if they turn to writing, tend to learn how to craft a story through osmosis in the sense that we pick up some elements of writing naturally. That’s not to say we start writing and it’s perfect or that we can’t consciously learn, but as readers we love story and there are some things we do when we’re writing that we probably don’t think about. For me, I can feel the rhythm of a story when I’m writing and I know when I’m off. I can feel when the opening is dragging, or the middle sagging, or when the ending really isn’t pulling it all together. Now, I don’t always know how to fix it. I may not even be able to pinpoint what’s not working, but I can feel it because I know how good fiction reads, how it makes me feel, how it punches me in the gut when that emotional impact and connection is there.

So onto some randomly selected tips:

  • Story (this happened, then this, then that) vs Plot (this happens therefore that happens, but then that happens). Plot is what drives the story forward and introduces conflict and tension. (I actually learned this is a workshop offered by Barbara Barnett-Stewart last year, but it was good reinforcement). [Pastan]
  • For worldbuilding, think about locations and landscape (sketch a map!), societal hierarchy, cultural elements, weapons and technology, deities, language (curse and swear words!). You’re not going to use everything, but knowing it will provide you as the author a better sense of the world you are building and add authenticity and authority to your writing. [Kashina]
  • Interweave (or connect) characters and conflict as much as possible. How can you add conflict/tension between your MC and a secondary characters? How about between two secondary characters? [Craft]
  • A story isn’t powerful because of events; a story is powerful because of how a character reacts to the events and the emotional impact of the events. [Craft]
  • Ending a chapter in the middle of a scene does not increase tension. It creates a false tension. Let chapters have their own arcs. [Craft]
  • Your main character should have a desire. They can have more than one, but one above all should propel the story forward (the “spark”). [Pastan]

So. Much. Information. I literally have pages of notes I’m reading through, saying to myself, ah, yes, that! And that! Don’t forget that!

What’s one of the best pieces of information you’ve picked up in a writing workshop or class? What classes or workshops have you attended? Did you feel they’ve helped? Let me know in the comments!

Next up: Pitch and Query: the Double-headed Dreaded Dragon.

(Don’t worry. In my last Next Up, I mentioned Asshats. They’re coming. Kelly Simmons‘ speech needs its own post.)

 

a vintage writing

 

 

 

Introverts, Writing, and…People!

 

aa writing introvert

I think a lot introverts are writers because we spend so much time in our heads (or with noses in books, in many cases). Some of us may be published, some not, some want to be, some write just for the pleasure of creating a well-turned phrase, or a beautiful image in a poem.

So non-writers might ask, well, why then do so many writing conferences exist?

I don’t claim to speak for every writer. I’m sure there are plenty of extroverted writers (I know a few…I think). But what I can say is that for me, a conference of any sort is justification for learning a few new breathing techniques, spending a week talking myself into going, and popping some extra Xanax.

It’s not that I don’t like talking. Ask my co-workers, or my family and friends. Sometimes I’m overflowing with words. It’s not even that I don’t like talking in front of people. I speak in front of groups all the time for various aspects of my life.

But small talk? Introducing myself to someone I don’t know? Please, I’d rather be chained to a chair to watch Episode I from Star Wars, or forced to drink decaf. It’s painful, I’m awkward, and hey, let’s just drink some wine in silence, while we scan Facebook and Twitter and just look like we’re socializing, okay?

Which brings us back to writing conferences. Why we introverted writers put ourselves in the situation. Simply because a good conference is an amazing experience. We get to learn from some great authors, non-fiction writers, and social media gurus. We listen to opening speeches and keynote speakers that inspire us to new heights of wordsmithing frenzy. We get to hang out with friends (if we’re lucky) and *gasp* meet new ones [Again, personal experience only, it takes me a while to work up the courage and usually it’s because I’m with someone I know already, but I do manage to meet a few people]. Plus, through all this, we get to be immersed with people who get us. People who understand how important the written word is, how addicting good stories can be, and how painful yet exhilarating creating fiction and others works can be.

I’m lucky. Philadelphia is home to the longest-running writers’ conference in the United States, the Philadelphia Writers’ Conference (PWC), which just concluded its 67th conference from June 10th through June 12th. My friend, James Knipp, is the current president, a terrific writer with a wicked mind for horror, and all-around great guy. Once again, he helped lead the PWC Board into making the annual conference a memorable experience. Over the next several posts, I will delve a little bit into the weekend’s experience, including the speakers and workshops, the social events, and the cool stuff I bought (books, of course!).

In the interest of transparency, I won a half scholarship, sponsored by the PWC, through the South Jersey Writers’ Group. The PWC offers several full scholarships by application as well as half scholarships to eligible writing groups. For the past several years, we have held a random drawing to determine the winner for our group and this year I was the lucky duck. The SJWG Board of Trustees was inspired that we have added our own scholarship for 2017; therefore, we will be awarding two members of our group a half scholarship to next year’s PWC in fulfillment of our mission as a premier writing resource in the South Jersey region.

Next post: Speakers, Workshops, and…Hats.